We asked ensemble members from Stage East’s upcoming show, 30 Neo-futurist Plays from Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind (30 Plays in 60 Minutes), a few questions in anticipation of their opening on October 15th. This week, we feature Lauren “L.” Elwood, Brian Schuth and Ric Craig. Stay tuned next week to hear from Peter Frewen, Jenie M. Smith and Caitlyn Stellrecht!
Read more about the production here.

Lauren “L.” Elwood 

What’s your favorite play in the show? 

All! Though I’ll admit that’s a copout, so I’ll go with Tableau For Three (Right This Way, Sir!). I get to tell a story with just my body, a couple of chairs, and maybe a short grumble or surprised gasp  — it’s a challenge I’m happily willing to accept.

Who should come see the show? 

Everyone! Though maybe that’s another copout. How about… hmmm… anyone craving a bit of chaos in their life???

What have rehearsals been like? 

Speedy and endearing! It’s my first time back on the stage since pre-pandemic and it’s still just as comforting and terrifying as it was in the before times.

Brian Schuth 

What’s your favorite play in the show? 

King Lear. Because who doesn’t want to play King Lear? But this way I don’t have to memorize four hours of text!

Who should see the show? 

Anyone who is ready to laugh in public

What have rehearsals been like?

I love rehearsal. This show gives you a chance —hell, demands—that you are constantly playing, because you have to keep changing who you are and what you’re doing.

Ric Craig 

What’s your favorite play in the show?

 I have not been able to see every one of the plays we are performing for TML, but I was fortunate enough to watch Peter rehearse An Apology. This by far is my favorite after watching his performance, and I’m sure it will be yours when you see it. You just cannot help yourself from being drawn into his anguish during this performance. At its roots, TML is fun as well as funny. We (performers as well as the audience) are yanked continuously through a complete spectrum of emotions. Schizophrenia runs rampant as dozens and dozens of individual characters are performed each night by only a half dozen cast members.

Who should see the show? 

If you are looking for a different kind of entertainment and enjoy playacting like you did as a child, you should be in the audience for every performance as no single night’s performance will be exactly like the one before it.


What have rehearsals been like? 

Rehearsals have been inspiring while watching the pros rehearse, but the most fun comes from the freedom of my own interpretation of so many various characters.